Malaspina Award


The III Malaspina Award (2020) has been conferred to the Australian artist Jennifer Turpin.

Australian artist Jennifer Turpin during the VI Australia-Spain Research Forum “Big Data”. Photo credit: Ángel R. López-Sánchez.

Jennifer was the first invited artist to the SRAP Water Forum in 2015 and she has extensively collaborated in the Art and Science activities of SRAP ever since. An outstanding outcome of this collaboration has been the “Operation Crayweed” project with Adriana Verges, that got the 2016 Sydney Water Environmental Artist Award; and that has involved many other actions conducing to the Festival of Seaweed in 2021. Jennifer’s work has become part of Sydney’s urban landscape. They include, among others, the sculpture “Halo” in Chippendale (2012 Engineering Excellence Awards), “Storm Waters”, in Zetland (2003 Planning NSW Award for design, NAWIC & the Lloyd Rees Civic Award RAIA); “Tied to Tie”, in Pyrmont (2000 Arup award for Art in Built Environment), and the “Light Line Social Square” project (2020 Lloyd Rees Award for Urban Design).

Jennifer Turpin’s work demonstrates the value of multidisciplinary collaboration between art, engineering, architecture and science, and has created a new dimension of liveability by the interactive play of urban spaces with the elements of nature (air, wind, water or vegetation).

The III Malaspina Award has been proudly sponsored by Navantia Australia. The award is embodied by the statuette “Heart” designed by the internationally renowned Spanish sculptor Óscar Martín de Burgos. He describes the statuette in the following video (in Spanish, but with English captions available).

The award ceremony took place on 27 November in Sydney, on the occasion of the 6th Australia- Spain Research Forum “Big Data” by the Spanish Researchers in Australia-Pacific (SRAP-IEAP). The statuette will be conferred by the Ambassador of Spain to Australia, H.E. Ms. Alicia Moral Revilla.

The III Malaspina Award Ceremony during the 6th Australia-Spain Research Forum “Big Data”, on Sydney, 27th November 2020.. Credit of the photo: Ángel R. López-Sánchez.

Previous winners of the Malaspina Award:

I Malaspina Award: Luke Stegemann (2018)

Luke Stegemann is an Australian writer based in South-East Queensland. He has worked in media, publishing and higher education. With a long career as a teacher, translator and journalist, he was formerly the managing editor of The Adelaide Review and the founding editor of The Melbourne Review. He has written for a wide range of Australian publications including Meanjin, The Monthly, The Age, the Sydney Morning Herald, Overland and the Australian Institute of International Affairs, as well as leading Spanish newspaper El País.

He discovered Spain by surprise in the 1980s. In love with the country, he had no choice but to return to live in it, and since then he combines seasons in Australia and seasons in Spain. Known for his affection for everything Spanish, Stegemann has written two books with a completely or partially Spanish theme: The Beautiful Obscure (Transmission Press, 2017) and Amnesia Road: Landscape, Violence and Memory (New South, March 2021). The Beautiful Obscure is a fascinating voyage of discovery revealing the unexpected and surprising connections between Australia and Spain from a multifaceted prism that summarises history, literature, social life and personal transformation.

All the info about the I Malaspina Award on this webpage.

II Malaspina Award: Universidad Loyola Andalucía (2019)

The 2019 Malaspina Award acknowledged “Universidad Loyola Andalucía” (Seville and Córdoba, Spain), for its extraordinary work pioneering close research ties between Australia and Spain. Loyola University’s partnership with five research centres from the University of Sydney and the Australian National University (ANU).

Professor Carlos García-Alonso Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research at Loyola has led an international research team to develop tools which are helping government and public agencies in Spain, Australia, the United Kingdom, Chile and Finland make better decisions about health care. This research strategy has promoted exchange for 10 researchers in Australia and Spain, international collaboration on 24 European and Australian projects, and research produced more than 40 scientific publications. This continuing cooperation has also included the promotion of Australian academics in Spain and vice versa. Dr Ian C. Simpson, formerly at University of Sydney, is the Director of the Department of Psychology at Loyola University Andalusia in Seville. Dr Jose A. Salinas is honorary senior lecturer at the College of Health and Medicine, Australian National University.

The Spain-Australia Council Foundation provided its support to this candidacy and recognised the academic initiative as a reference model for future collaboration between Australian and Spanish research centres and companies.

All the info about the II Malaspina Award on this webpage.